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child custody and visitation Archives

How to determine custody when only the mother is known

If a child is born in California without a father's name on his or her birth certificate, it may be unclear who has custody. As a general rule, custody will be determined in the state by looking at what is in the best interest of the child. However, other states may have different rules relating to who gets custody of a child born when the parents aren't married and no father is on the birth certificate.

Child custody cases may hinge on stability

For many parents in California who decide to divorce or end their relationship, dealing with child custody issues can be the most challenging aspect of the process. Both parents want to remain connected to their children and often seek a significant amount of time with their kids. In some cases, parents can work together to agree to joint custody and a shared schedule that reflects the best interests of the children as well as the desires of each parent.

Ways of approaching child custody

California parents who are getting a divorce have a number of options available when it comes to child custody. There are many combinations of sole or joint legal and physical custody that may work for them. When parents have legal custody, they are able to make decisions about major issues in the child's life such as health care and education. The child lives with the parent who has physical custody or splits time between parents if physical custody is joint.

What to know about dads in America

Dads in California and throughout the nation see their role as a father as central to their identity as a person. This is according to a 2015 poll conducted by Pew Research. According to the poll, fathers were just as likely as mothers to say that their role of parent best defined them. Furthermore, they were about just as likely as mothers to say that parenting was always fun or always a rewarding experience.

Nesting in California child custody cases

Californians who are parents and who are planning to divorce often have concerns about how to best handle their child custody and parenting time arrangements. For most parents, their primary goals are to protect their children while helping them to deal with the divorces and the changes in their lives.

Mistakes parents can make during custody disputes

When estranged parents are heading to a California courtroom to determine who will have primary custody of the children, the process can be complex and emotional. However, there are certain mistakes that parents can make. In some cases, these mistakes could have an impact on the outcome of the custody dispute.

Child custody and the death of a parent

California fathers who have not established paternity will need to do so if the custodial parent dies and the father wishes to become the custodial parent. If a custodial parent dies and the other parent is unable or unwilling to become the child's guardian, there are a few things that might happen.

Thinking of children during a divorce

The end of a California couple's marriage can often be a difficult and emotional period. It can become even more complicated when the couple has young children. While many ex-spouses will be angry with each other, parents who are going through a divorce are well-advised to think of the effect that extreme anger can have on their kids.

3 child custody considerations for military men

You promised to serve your country and are proud to be able to do so. Now that you have a child, you find that military life doesn't always make parenting easy. This problem is compounded if you and your child's mother aren't together any longer. Not only do you have to deal with the normal issues that come with child custody cases, you also have to deal with deployments, irregular schedules, and other issues associated with life in the military. Whether you are in the California National Guard or serving in another branch, these considerations might make your child custody case a bit easier.

How mediation can help resolve coparenting disputes

California parents whose former spouse decides to move in order to be closer to a new partner may face longer commuting times and other challenges. For example, the parent and the new partner might dislike one another, and neither may like the other being in contact with the child. Parents may still carry a lot of anger at one another after the divorce, and the move might become the battleground for that anger. However, the result may be that the child is the one who loses out.

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